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. >> but they are more -- their goal is to educate the public on a issue that impacts the environment, not lining their pocketbooks. neil: all right. >> their goal is to influence legislation, that is the point. neil: if you can agree on outlawing yoko ono concerts we might be off to the races, but thank you. this just in, that thing on your plate is still a biscuit. but it is not "seabiscuit." think this horse meat threat went too far. during sequestration, meet the restaurant ceo who said it damn near cost him business before and after sequestration. (announcer) scottrade knows our clients trade and invest their own way. with scottrade's smart text, i can quickly understand my charts, and spend more time trading. their quick trade bar lets my account follow me online so i can react in real-time. plus, my local scottrade office is there to help. because they know i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. voted "best investment services company." it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it
we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> let me finish with a circular firing squad assembled in the republican party. the party began in the years heading up to the civil war. you had the whig party, the abolitionists. the whigs were the politics ready to make practical political decisions. in 1860, they all got together behind abraham lincoln. i wonder if they do it again in 2016 in the party's still split in two. the establishment types, they like holding office and are willing to bend a little to get power. the abolitionists are on principle. as for gay marriage, they'd just as soon there not be in gays, period. they're not about to let them have wedding rings and all other parts of straight life. the karl rove winning elections and the abolitionists wing are in for a prolonged situation. 2014 will be tough, but once these two gangs, the palin and rove crowds, have to meet again in 2016, it's not going to be pretty
with the government and a very war hawkish administration seemed to be anti-american. so in that environment, the voices that were speaking out against this war, but in that environment, those voices could be muffled and people were being painted as being anti-american because they were pro peace. >> right. mrs. walsh, we saw what donald rumsfeld said on twitter. we saw dick cheney say he would do it all over again and not acknowledge any mistakes. >> the main fault -- i don't spend a lot of time thinking about my faults i guess would be the answer. >> no kind of political introspection there. but will history let these men off the hook for what they did? >> no, they're going down in history for a horrible, terrible war. i was going to say a lapse of judgment, but it was not a lapse of judgment. it was a deliberate act. they cooked the evidence. they browbeat people. they would karl rove as their political hench men. the vote was scheduled on the eve of the elections deliberately. i don't want to let democrats off the hook. 29 senate democrats voted to authorize the use of force. some apolog
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> rnc chairman reince priebus. he joins us, nice to see you, sir. >> thank you, greta. >> greta: i should say happy birthday. >> it's nice to celebrate my birthday with you tonight and i had fun with my kids and wai wife sally. >> greta: this report was not prepared by you, right? >> it was five co-chairs that traveled around the country and we talked to -- and i participate in all the listening sessions around the country. we talked to over 50,000 people about the election, things they perceived went well. what the other side went well and things we didn't do that people wished we did. it was a full-blown analysis from everything to mechanics to campaign finance laws. >> greta: one of the questions, the perception according to you, is that the republican party-- >> according to polling. >> greta: a party of rich-- yeah, polling. party of rich, narrow, stuffy, out of touch peo
for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> get ready for a big western style showdown, a sheriff takes on a governor in about 12 hours, the governor of colorado will sign new gun control legislation, but a sheriff in one colorado county is refusing to enforce the new laws. wells county sheriff john cook joins us, good evening, sheriff. >> good evening, greta, thank you for having me on. >> greta: thanks for being here. i understand the new law falls into two categories, background checks and magazines. why have you decided not to enforce the new law? >> for several reasons, but first, i'm sorry to see tomorrow come because we're going to throw away 150 years of tradition in the state of colorado. i feel sorry for our citizens, once the governor signs the bills. but i'm opposed to them because first off, it's a violation, infringement on our constitutional rights, not only the u.s. c
to invest in this environment? >> we have to have a regulatory environment that supports growth. >> neil: you don't think it does. >> absolutely not. i think is suppresses growth and we should be putting all these regs -- look at north dakota on private land. 3%. they're growing like crazy, creating jobs everywhere. three new high schools being built in bismarck. all kinds of things being built in the dakotas. new hospitals, because employment is booming, housing is going up as fast as it can. that's what you get from opening up the world. we have had some of that boom in northern new york. if we could get new york to approve frack. >> neil: they won't. you're a modest guy but one of the most requested corporate voices in the speaker circuit, and at love 0 ceos seek you out for advice. i don't want you to betray secrets but when they seek your counsel, what are they generally needing help on? what are they telling you they needure guidance on? >> generally i'm involved in a lot of organizational structure. people, processes, acquisitions. i'm not involved in policy discussions with gover
the cash method of accounting. what to make of, well the entire environment for growing a business in this country? ali wing, founder and ceo of giggle, the baby chain of stores and online sales. she joins us now. in terms of what you're seeing, just broadly, ali, the tax environment for you, it is getting worse, no? >> it is. i'm actually just in the middle of annual compensation reviews. i know every employee right now is feeling less in their take-home pay. that is a pressure of a different type for businesses. but it's the same old theme, whether it was not charging online only businesses sales tax or people off-line had to have it. just needing to even the playing field. not a disinincident tiff to big next generation of big businesses in america and right now it is still uneven. dagen: we talked about though the complications created by government, local government, state governments, the federal government in running a business today. we're celebrating the anniversary of the health care law and, what we've seen washington do in recent years. is it getting worse to grow a bus
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ...it's my job to look after it. you're o♪ ♪meout leo! some things won't last 25 years. ah! woof. some things will. save up to 20% on an ikea kitchen. >> it's sort of a hoax that you would take the money and repeal the bill so no benefits but we'll keep the savings. >> how are democrats and republicans ever going to agree on a budget? is it even possible? former speaker of the house, newt is here. good to see you here. she's called it a hoax. i am sure republicans have said similar things about democratic proposals. but how is this ever going to be resolved? >> it may want be in the short run. i think have you to give paul ryan a lot of credit for an enormous amount of work. so much work that he got the senate democrats to bring up a budget for the first time in almost four years. but i think you are in a period wh
sense. in the immediate environment we're in today, one of these media campaigns can be a flash in the pan. but i think this is a long game and think it's a long game for good reason. i actually disagree with the governor that these politicians are necessarily being stupid. by going against the public on the issue. because this is one of those asymmetrical issues. most people are in favor of universal background checks, but the people who care about it are going to vote on the issue, are disproportion eige porgportiona opposed to them. i think we need to convince voters who are in favor of background checks to hold politicians accountable for their votes on it i think it's supportable, because violent crime has been in decline for 20 years -- >> not gun-related crime. >> i want to talk about that. finish your point first. >> i think the reason that the political environment is actually more difficult for gun control now than it was 20 years ago is because people are less afraid of violent crime than they used to be. and so i think it takes some convincing to tell people no reall
. >> is if they are able to thrive in a college environment and their background. we have to make sure that we're putting those students through college. we don't want to force that. neil: zacatecas document elitist education system where someone is picking and choosing. >> society can't support every little thing. neil: what do you think of that? >> the problem is always going to be easy money. when you're giving away money or anything else, when it gets too easy and you see a lot of people not paying it back, you join that party. that is what is going on here. you have all of these policies out there that really hurt the job market. and that is where this comes around. then you get into the other part of the equation that everyone else has been bailed out. why not meet? neil: cash-strapped homeowners, banks. if you are up against the world, someone is going to be here to cover you. and people exhibit behavior and they were not deliberately paying their mortgages to qualify for federal rescue program. some graduates may be thinking the same thing? >> i don't know that there is that level with sophistica
republicans, the republicans that cared about the environment and privacy are absolutely excluded and fearful of speaking up. >> hal: right. >> caller: and that is really the mind-control the thought-control police that people have to look at as the example of where we don't want to go. i think it's so critical. >> hal: i always find it very shocking when there's this belief on the right that the expression of someone else's rights that are in the constitution, in the bill of rights, the acting on those rights in your own way is somehow a violation of theirs simply because it differs with their religious beliefs or makes them feel icky. if i'm creeped out, i don't want them to make it legal, because then i have to explain it to my kid. and the kid is more hip than you are, and the kid is like it's okay with me. and then you have to have a conversation with what your belief system is. you used to not even have to talk about it. if somebody got pregnant that wasn't supposed to. you sent her off to her aunt and she became unpregnant. >> i think you are right. th
to reduce their exposure. will we now have is a terrific tax environment. >> know it's several thousands of dollars. cheryl: thanks to all of you. different perspectives on the tax environment. it's rough out there. thank you for being here. >> a pleasure. >> thank you. cheryl: all right. let's share something highly -- happy. new jobs. unemployment is down. the reasons why coming up. as we go to break, let's take a look at someone in names overall on the nasdaq. we will be right back. ♪ all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. ♪ cheryl: time for your westcoast minute. san francisco's union bank is expanding in arizona. the bank has decided to open a new mortgage operation center. the center is expected to create 250 jobs. the governor offered tax incentives to union bank which is owne
because of the environment -- involvement of all of the united states. will want toca sustain that and renew it. we are very pleased president obama and his administration have been so open, so available, and so encouraging. that caters to people with different traditions and cultures and aspirations. there is more that unites us than what divides us. it is the responsibility of those of us who have the privilege of holding political office to the -- to defend, under pennsylvania, and reinforce principles, values, and institutions, to show real leadership where real leadership is demanded. is characterized by openness, respect, and the wish to harness and nurture relationships with those within troubled communities to have the will and ability to walk to resolve issues peacefully using politics to succeed where violence never can. in the drafting of the budget we wereeuropean union, able to get included in their for expenditure on peace projects and divided lines in fragile communities in areas of northern island where young pennsylvania -- young men in particular have been le
. but this is what you expect from the federal government. your education, roads, bridges, a healthy environment, and what's mandated by the constitution, our armed forces to protect us. but this is where it gets really scary. all of this blue part here for medicare, social security is what we take in. in other words, all of our cash on hand, if you will, the money that you pay the federal government every time you get a paycheck or pay your income taxes, this is all devoted to medicare, medicaid, social security. in other words, everything else, your education, the environment, our roads, bridges, ports, armed forces all of that money to pay for that basically is borrowed. it's just borrowed, or worse just printed. this is the sad reality that we are facing today. but with republican house leadership and working with democrats who are actually willing to come to the table and compromise and not just work with us, work for you, we can save social security and medicare. by the way, when you hear democrats, or see the videos of them throwing your grandmother off a cliff or telling you that republi
the green zone in a humvee. certainly in those environments, we have to act differently. we've let certain things slide the cyber threat from china and nuclear threat from iran that i think deep cover small nimble, elite covert operatives could do a really good job of collecting intelligence. we need to get back to that. michael: it does make sense. you know better than everybody that you can change while still employing some of the important parts of the past. one of the members of the committee that warned the president about the distractions in the intelligence committee former senator david born is on that committee. he said: michael: it sounds like he agree with the senator. >> i do agree with him. you know, the c.i.a. was slow to change after the end of the cold war and then we were caught flat-footed and september 11 occurred, the biggest intelligence failure of our lifetimes. i think the reason that the c.i.a. is so slow to change, and can be so short-sighted is because it's a huge bureaucracy and we keep adding layers when i think we should be scaling back on it. >> one of the oth
's part of the problem. if you have any concern about the environment, if if you have any concern about climate change, are you going to look to someone that's a party that's saying things like that? that's not offering any solutions and i think that's part of the problem. cap and trade, which has been thoroughly demonized, that was a conservative idea. that's a market-based approach to dealing with climate change. democrats have adopted some of these goods, market-based things that they used to do. if they are going to be an effective party and opposition, they have to offer nuance responses. it's worked for them a while but now that well has run dry, so to speak. >> and i think joan made a very good point. usually they take an autopsy after you've been pronounced dead. they don't usually take 5 autopsies while you're still alive. >> that's not a good sign. >> they need a political resurrection, not change. >> that's right. >> thank you for your time. check "the cycle" at 3:00 p.m. eastern right here on msnbc. >>> ahead, hey, republicans, if you do unpopular things, you become unpopula
-chairs heard of the need for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hack-a-thons in tax-heavy cities like san francisco, austin, denver and new york to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we'll embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we'll upgrade gop.com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're going to be setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to the silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologynologists -- technologists to join in our efforts and serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all of this, we'll enter 2014 and 2016 with a
into that school building because it will create a better environment for success and help keep that neighborhood solid and grow things. >> governor snyder, thanks so much for talking with us. chris, back to you. >>> rehema, governor snyder, thank you. >>> and you're looking live at ayman, jo o oman, jordan. here are president obama and king abdullah of jordan. this is the final country that president obama will visit on his middle east trip. let's go to them now. >> all jordanians to welcome you and your distinguished delegation back here in jordan. i fondly remember your visit here several years ago when you were a senator, it is a great delight to welcome you back to jordan as the president of the united states enjoying your second term. we're delighted with the in-depth discussions that were very, very fruitful on the strategic and historic partnership. and you've been an old friend as has the united states for so many decades. we are very grateful, to you, sir, and the administration as well as congress and the american people for the continuous support that has been shown to jordan over so
motives making it impossible for compromise to occur or produce an environment where people of different parties can talk to each other so we talk more and get common ground at the end of the day. time will tell. i am hopeful. >> if there's no deal by end of july, early august, will you vote to raise the debt ceiling? that's when it has to be raised. >> i think it will come down to all of that. i am not getting into what we will or will not do. i believe we can make sure default is not going to happen. i am not worried about us defaulting. i think we can get the authority from the president to prevent default from happening. but i have to tell you, wolf, we can't keep running up deficits like this. it will damage the economy deeply. people say we don't have a crisis on the horizon, of course we do. we have a debt on a tear. if the debt takes off like it is projected to do so, it is not only hurting our economy today, it is destroying it for the next generation. we can't sit around and be complicit with that. the problem is we have to do something about that. >> one final question. senato
of the committee on the environment. >> the fact that all of this is happening is due to man-made gases i really believe is the greatest hoax ever perpetrate on the american people. >> perhaps more troubling, senator inhofe told rachel maddow last year that he used to believe climate change was real, until he realized the solution wasn't free of charge. >> i was actually on your side of this issue, when i was chairing that committee and i first heard about this, i thought, until i found out what it cost. >> you see, for senator inhofe, the cost was the problem. particularly, the cost to his re-election hopes. the top funders of senator inhofe's campaign since 2006 are from the oil and gas industries, to the tune of nearly $500,000. inhofe's top contributors all benefit from loose environmental regulations. instead of blaming a groundhog for the unpredictable nature of our changing climate, perhaps we should point the finger at the actual human beings who have the power to do something about it. or maybe punxsutawney phil should look for some benefactors in the energy industry. that seems like th
environment. sandra: so, tuna, you're saying this move away from pay tv. will hit every provider than one. >> comcast, the reason they bought nbc universal to protect themselves a little bit on the distribution exposure that they have. what you're seeing guys like disney and cbs and parent company news corp are considered some of the premier content providers out there, someone like content nirvana, right? so the industry is going through a renaissance where a lot of company we're recommending leveraging content and monetizing them in a very, very fragmented landscape where the consumer has a lot more options than ever before. so i think the balance of power is gradually and will continue to shift in favor of branded entertainment content. adam: i think jay leno would agree with you on nbc call because he thinks they're extinct. let me ask you this. what content creators do you like? i think we're one of them, news corp, the parent company of fox business. who do you like? what companies do you really see as doing well because of this? i know that the time warner pays us to carry programi
is not only the environment -- although he did use the word environment -- but it's also us. it's you and me, our brothers and sisters, it's moms and dads. that's part of our mission in life, to be of service to others. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we tried to get out of the way of the music from time to time. it's mid 50's in rome this morning and pretty steady wind at 15 to 20 miles an hour. you can see making for a beautiful sight with the flags there. the music is not one choir but two. lauren green with some details on those. one of them sang at the pap al mass. >> this is the sistine chapel choir along with the sacred music choir. both of them are vatican choirs. interesting enough, the last time i heard the sistine chapel choir was in november when they premiered a work by monsignor raptsinger, the brother of pope benedict xvi. they are an incredible choir. you saw one of the members, sopranos singing earlier as part of the mass. they are an incredible choir. they have sung all over the world and they are known all over the world, and they sing in many sacred music festivals. they are mainstays of
, and the poor, and the environment, in all of god's creatures underneath it. we have an excerpt from the homily that pope francis gave. take a listen. >> let us protect christ in our life in order to protect others in order to protect creation. the vocation of protecting does not regard just us christians. it has a dimension that proceeds and that is simply human. it regards everyone. it is protecting the entire creati creation, the beauty of creation. as the book of genesis tells us. >> father edward beck, cnn describe outer, good to have you, as always. that message, simple, simply human, we have to take care of everybody, what do you think it means to those leaders from 132 different delegations? >> we can't help but hear that in reference to sexual abuse scandal, i don't think, especially from an american context. all of those leaders there know the problems the catholic church has had. and how many times did he say, protector, protector, protector. he said at one point protector of children. and so that certainly is going to be a message coming out of this. the sex abuse scandal, and his p
today's complicated issues in today's environment? >> would you agree there is some responsibility on the part of the members of congress to educate themselves to be able to speak about this? >> absolutely. >> because we were knee deep in the fight and they had no clue. >> you are absolutely right. i spent basically 14 months doing nothing but talking about health care reform. and i would walk into a room in my district with 50 people who wr were ready to strangle me, and spend 50 minutes going through the options, and after that period of time, they would walk out and say, hey, this sounds great. but it totally was an education process, and we didn't do -- as a party we didn't do very good job of that. individual people did better than others for sure. >> hal: right. and we only have a couple of seconds left with you, and first of all i want to thank you for being the congressman from the great state of kentucky but there is one other issue, and i want to personally thank you. and you can go to yarmuth.house.gov, is that you are talking about introducing -
create and raise in the best environment. >> oh, boy. >> i couldn't hear that. >> stephanie: she was talking about -- i'm sorry. play it one more time. >> put your headphones on. >> i'm sorry. >> stephanie: i hated to aren't you than beautiful hair too. >> the institution of marriage and marriage laws are designed to attach mothers and fathers to each other and to the children that they may create and raise in the best environment. >> straights are automatically great parents. >> stephanie: you can read a story a day of some horrific story about straight parents. >> two things to say about that, that somehow marriage is only about raising children and there's plenty of straight couples that have no intention of raising any children at all. and in fact, if they do raise children many of them aren't even married. but i can tell you i know many, many many, many same-sex couples, whether it's two lesbians together or two gay men, and they're making wonderful parents and their kids are wonderfully adjusted. it really -- their children may turn out gay but you know, their sexuality --
on record about this, saying it is not good for the environment. >> this pipeline would create 35 permanent jobs and yet if you were to read the normal media reports, you would think this was a creator of hundreds of thousands of jobs. so this is an export pipeline. this is going to create major risks for the us. it goes through one of the largest sources of fresh water, and we don't need the oil. >> bill: what is happening in the senate this week. i know we have talked ahead of time that the senate is voting on this issue -- >> potentially. the budget bill is moving through the senate this week and there is a lot of talk that an amendment will be introduced. so there is a group of senator, again, heavenly backed by oil money, that are pushing an amendment to take the control away from the president and moving the vote to congress. >> bill: who were the senators who are leading the opposition to keystone? >> senator hoven and boxus who have stepped forward for it. senator boxer, senator white house. and like i said before, unfortunately the oil contributions to the
to cost them a lot more money and have little benefit on the environment. back in 2008, president obama made this statement: "will america watch as clean energy jobs and industry of the future flourish in countries like spain, japan, and germany?" that's what he said. we need to emulate spain, japan and germany. but spain right now is having to cut back dramatically on its really forward-leaning green mandates. they went probably further or as far as any country in europe. it's been a total disappointment. they are reducing their subsidies. their economy is in shambles, and they're not doing well. "the financial times," just february of this year wrote this -- quote -- "the spanish government's latest bid to cut its growing debts to the country's energy sector is expected to slash profits at renewable energy companies asthma tkreud continues to -- as madrid continues to grapple with a $37 billion deficit built up through the years of subsidies." they go on to say "in akiona, spain's second largest wind power operator, shares in that company have tumbled almost 20% with analysts expect t
what this creates is an environment where, well, we don't know. we don't know. it could be another fake one. another duke lacrosse situation and damn her for doing what she did. she should be taken into custody. >> megyn: she stole his life, david. she stole it. five years, plus he had this promising football future. and i mean, if you heard him in the interview he seemed like an earnest young man and wants to move on with his life, but this problem is bigger than just brian banks now. and the system has a problem and there is a real question about whether the system needs to ask this young woman for some justice. >> well, you know, there's no question about it, megyn. and props to my law school whose assisted in his exoneration. and the prosecution would be giving false information which is a misdemeanor in california, now, the victim himself, now the victim in this case, mr. banks, does not want to go forward with the prosecution. he doesn't want to cooperate ap also, megyn, you have the third prong of this problem, even though the dna, the defense attorney got dna test and said it wa
you'll see a depressed environment where the unemployment rate is over 26%, severe austerity cuts and overhauls of gutted worker benefits, safety net programs, harming seniors and the country's poorest populous, taxes on families an businesses have increased at a sharp rate and violent social unrest has become common place. most recently we've seen a proposal to bail out cyprus banks that could raid the savings account of its own population. these are the realities of debt-ridden countries. these are the realities of liberal policies that tax too much, spend too much, borrow too much and produce far too few jobs. we cannot afford the path that we're on. thankfully we have time to change. america's course and the house republican budget provides a so-year plan. it puts brakes on our spending levels, laying out a thoughtful program, reforms to ensure successful government services are solvent for generations to come, prioritizes a comprehensive restructuring of or tax code to simplify the system and improbables our fiscal system in a way -- improves our fiscal system in way that wou
strong, to protect our communities and environment and uphold the sacred commitment that we have made to our veterans. mr. president, i believe that our budget reflects the values and priorities of the vast majority of families across our country. it is a responsible and credible approach, and it offers a clear path to a balanced and bipartisan deal. house republicans are debating a very different approach this week. the proposal that passed through their budget committee would be devastating for our economic recovery and threaten millions of jobs. it would make extreme cuts to the investments in infrastructure and education and innovation that we need right now to lay down a strong foundation for a broad-based economic growth. it would dismantle medicare and would cut off programs to support the middle class and most vunchl families and it would do all that while refusing to ask the wealthiest americans and biggest corporations to even contribute their fair share. mr. president, the american people are going to have an opportunity to examine these budgets side by side over the coming
maintain freedom of movement in a variety of complex environments around the globe. that is the joint operational access concept. a subset of that is how the navy and air force are collaborating to achieve that. the army and marine corps also have a role perry to your point about when i am in china about not aimed ate, is china. the united states has interests in the global commons, interest in maintaining freedom of movement, freedom of action, and the things we do at the development of technologies and tactics are fundamentally to guarantee that that freedom will continue to exist, regardless of who is threatening. may i ask you about what you consider is the impact of the non resolution of the palestinian best israeli conflict on the security of the gulf, and what specific challenge that iran presents now can be enhanced or ignored by the resolution of the conflict? >> identify yourself. >> thank you. peacel, the mideast process and those attempting or intending to continue to seek progress in that regard or dumb started, depending on who you are, is outside the realm of the milita
more on that. if we could talk about is the changing energy environment globally and especially in the united states, as the united states becomes more self-sufficient rather than independent, and how that impacts the relationship with our countries? >> yes, you know, i think that -- we have had some divergences. some of it comes down to messaging, as we were saying before. we have the same sorts of reservations and worries about exactly what is the u.s. policy and will the u.s. actually back up those policies as the other allies do. that extend beyond the middle east. the divergence has been the ascendancy of islamic groups. the united states have been relatively sanguine about that. many are worried about the intentions of groups like the muslim brotherhood. when it comes to iran, i think there is a concern amongst the allies we focus on what is exclusively on the nuclear issue, almost as if we are having an arms control negotiations. many of our allies see it in a much broader sense, causing trouble in the region. again, i don't think that the administration doesn't see those
the environment and the poorest and the weakest. cansaid a little tenderness open up a horizon of hope. >> 34 years ago we began providing televised access to congress and the every day workings of the government. c-span, created in 1979 by america's cable companies and brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> the winners have been selected in this year's c-span's studentcam documentary competition on the theme "your message to the president.'' the grand prize winner was josh. first prize for his work on the economy and spending. one person prize with a documentary on transportation along with two other boys. see all the videos on our website. >> "washington journal" continues. host: merideth shiner is a staff writer for roll call. here's a headline from a recent piece -- are sixhere subcommittees and of those, three of them are not shared by women. threedition to those p chaired by women, three of them subcommittee is chaired by women. given the history of women in politics, it's a pretty remarkable thing. the other thing they are doing, they're not just coming to t
,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in constant fear of becoming collateral damage? today iraq is a sad shadow of a society that once boasted the best infrastructure in the region, instability and violence fester on this very day and now it teeters on the brink of an inevitable civil war. this is the legacy of our last 10 years, and i still don't understand why. i hope this anniversary will remind us that a whole new generation of veterans are waiting to help reintegrate into the civilian life. i believe it's time to elevate our level of commitment to these veterans. i'm introducing a bill to create a commission on veterans' care, to investigate what we as a society can do to help our men and women come home. i hope it will remind us that no lives, regardless of nationality, should be taken lightly. i hope it will remind us as to why the next time. and i hope it won't take another war to get that answer. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore:
for compromise to occur, or will he produce an environment where people of different parties can talk to each other so that we talk more and then end up finding common ground and getting an agreement at the end of the day. time will tell i'm hopeful but trust would verify. >> if there is no deal by the end of july early august will you vote to raise the nation's debt ceiling? that's when it has to be raised. >> i'm not going to get into what we will or will not do. i do believe that we can make sure the default is not going to happen. i'm not really worried about us defeating. i think we can give the authority to the president to prevent default. i have to tell you, wolf. we can't keep running up deficits like this. it will damage our economy deeply and people are saying that we don't have a crisis on the horizon. of course we do. we've got a debt that is on a tear right now. if the debt takes off like it's projected to do, it's not only hurting our economy today but destroying it for the next generation. we just can't sit around and be complicit with that. that means we have to do something
't it be the people in the most fragile work environments? won't it be the people with less skills? won't they be the ones that would suffer the most? don't we have an obligation as a united states senate to reach out to the house and say we get it, this is dangerous. we don't know for sure where we're going, but we know shame on us if we allow decent, hard-working people struggling to get by right now to get hammered by another fiscal crisis that erskine bowles and alan simpson virtually guaranteed was on the way. i think we have a duty. i think we have a responsibility. i think when the american people find out it's not going to take massive slashing of spending, as our colleagues say, a lot of the programs that we can get can be more efficient than they have ever been, and we get just as much benefit even if they don't get as much money. there hadn't been any reform, any management improvements in this government in decades. i will just say politically i thought that was the greatest offer that governor romney had. he was a very good manager. in my opinion, we have had enough speech
changing strategic environment, and about america's interests looking forward. finally, i would add as a qualification for today's discussion, and like most former holders of high office in washington, he has been willing over and over again to step outside the conventional wisdom when the issue aren't said taking some risks with his own reputation. is one of mcmaster the most prominent of a very small, elite, important class of individuals who have earned the title of warrior soldier. he has been willing to critically examine the past and has done so with such power rather than end his military career, the work has advanced it. his ph.d. in pieces became a widely influential book beliesiction of duty: that led to vietnam." the title gives you some idea of his appetite for straight talk. he is equally known for achievement as a combat commander, earning a silver star for leadership in the 1991 gulf war, and even broader recognition for his enormously influential success in the ar in the calif iraq war. he went back and forth between field command and staff positions culminating in h
environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-411-7040 or visit trylyric.com for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. bill: you're about to hear from a brave teenager outsmarting the burglars. she's 15. she was home when she heard the intruder sneak inside, she grabbed a phone, ducked inside of a closet to hide and called 911. bill: and they did. at one point you could even hear the burglars, coming within inches of where she was hiding. the teen said she stayed calm, and she stayed quiet. bill: great job by that operator too. only moments later, the trio of teenage burglars walked out of the house and into the hands of the police. cops say they may be behind a slew other burglaries in that neighborhood. heather: well, the killing of colorado's prison chief putting the spotlight on the potential dangers of his job. tom clements was murdered on his own doorstep, it happened on tuesday. autho
. >> and to your point, joe, i think what's happening is a spotlight is being shown on the school environment. and the reason is, kids are in the school building 180 days a year. it is where they consume 50% of their calories per day. so you have a captive audience in the school building. but what we have to do is we have to direct more resources into the school building. the first thing that's getting cut is access to healthy nutrition. the first thing that's getting cut is access to physical activity. which is why we made an announcement with the first lady just a couple weeks ago, let's move active schools to get more kids out there and moving. it's critical, though, i come from the business world. and the first thing when i stepped into this epidemic that i said to dr. satcher and to some of our partners is, no one of us can do this alone. there's no one size fits all strategy. we have to do this in a collaborative effort together. so we focus largely on bringing the private sector into the conversation. how do we form a public/private partnership where corporate america is brought into t
jobs, clean up the environment, and be able to keep our way of life going on the chesapeake bay. so, madam president, you can see why today we just had three great marylanders, each doing a very different thing, but what i'm so proud of with, you know, captain cullen, larry symms, christina quigley is that each in their own way was trying to make a difference, wanted to protect america. the other was to protect jobs and a way of life on the chesapeake bay. and the other to inspire young women not only to be ready for the playing fields of la crosse but for the playing fields of life. all three, in her own way, were inspirational leaders. all three, in their own way, made a difference in the lives of the people that they came in touch w i just want to say, god bless them and god treat them kindly and may their souls rest in peace. madam president, i yield the floor. ms. mikulski: madam president, i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: quorum call: quorum call:
, truly. because my whole life i've cared about environment and i've cared about infrastructure. and the way the senate works, they put those two together. so not only do i get to talk about clean air and clean water and safe drinking water and cleaning up superfund sites and protecting the health of our families, but i also get to talk about jobs, jobs, jobs that are created when we build roads and bridges and highways. and water systems. but there is something that does not bring us together on that committee and that's the issue of climate change. and so what i've decided to do is to come down to the floor every monday that it's possible for me to do it, and the floor is available, to talk just a few minutes about the devastating consequences of unchecked climate disruption. and i want to discuss and put into the record every week the latest scientific information. on march 4, i started these talks and i talked about a front-page story in the "usa today" that spotlighted the impacts of climate change unfolding around us. the story is the first in a yearlong series called "why
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